And So It Goes

#31 – Tuesday October 18th

Done. As of today, the paintings are at Perimeter. Prior to the exhibition, the paintings are photographed, framed, then returned to the gallery for installation. The exhibition opens on November 18th and will run through the end of the year.  The past couple of days have been hectic, putting the finishing touches on these two paintings, and prepping the canvasses for shipping, and now that the paintings are out of the studio, it’s a quiet feeling. Though a little odd, because these paintings have been a part of my daily life for well over a year, with a couple of canvasses having been in progress for the better part of three. But it’s not the end. I’ve a painting still in the studio that will or won’t make it to Chicago depending on how it develops, and the materials to stretch up another few canvasses. And so it goes on.

Speaking of going on, the details of the SRAM’s pART PROJECT auction and event have been announced. The on line auction begins November 20th and culminates with gala event, in Chicago, on November 30th, where the final moments of the auction will take place. All the auction proceeds will go to support World Bicycle Relief. For additional details, including auction updates, event info, viewing the artists pART sculptures and bios visit the SRAM pART PROJECT website. SRAM provided each artist a CD containing four images of their sculptures, originally taken for the project website.  To see the “official” four views of my SRAM pART sculpture, click on the image to the right.

This week, in celebration of my tenth exhibition at Perimeter, a painting from the 1997 show. This exhibition was reviewed by Arts and Antiques magazine.

Thanks for reading.

Charles

Dancing, Prancing, Wrapped Up and Boxed

#30 – Tuesday October 11th

The new paintings certainly have their share of lovely lines dancing and prancing across their surfaces, and looking at the trajectory of my work, line has almost always been front and center. I don’t think the act of viewing a painting as static, and regardless of how closely a painting exclusively mimics a purely visual or intellectual experience, there is always a story being told, and yes the beginning, middle, and end can be turned about, or so obscure as to be unrecognizable as narrative . . . but still it’s there (and as far as I’m concerned, no story is a story in and of its self). For me, line is the tie that binds. Line is the thread facilitating the tour of discovery. I draw my lines with a brush, charcoal, oil and pastel sticks and graphite, carving them into their final path with a sharp-edged tool. While I chose all my materials with care, I have a certain affinity for mechanical pencils, and these are a few from my collection. A vintage yellow marbled Bakelite, a white contemporary Autopoint, several multi-lead and promotional mechanical pencils I’ve inherited from my draftsman par excellent father, a silver Retro 51, the odd group of old utilitarian lead holders, and a red KOH-I-NOR large lead holder (I’ve three of these, one each with black, brown and white leads).  I prefer a relatively large lead size (.9 mm and up) and a softer lead (3b to 6b). These lead properties give a more nuanced line both in hue and value, and a line more open to manipulation. Yes, the line binds and a proper tool to tie the knot.

In the continuing countdown to the opening of the tenth exhibition of my work at Perimeter Gallery, Chicago . . . this week, selections from the 1994 show. Gone are the segmented canvasses, now an integrated pictorial space, the volumes transitioned into smaller etherial presences and my affair with line began in earnest.

Speaking of counting down, the new paintings are almost ready to be sent off to the gallery . . . here they are, being wrapped and boxed up.

Thanks for reading.

Charles

Eight weeks – Done and Undone, again

Jumping over the stop and go house#29 – Tuesday October 4th

Only eight more weeks until the opening of the exhibition at Perimeter Gallery and I’m still working on several canvasses that I hope might be completed in time to be included. However this week I’m shipping the canvasses that are  finished to the gallery. Once in Chicago, they’ll be photographed, sent off to the framer, and returned to Perimeter to be installed for the opening of the exhibition on November 18th.

So first off, two of the canvasses in progress. There have been a few little adjustments in the painting highlighted last week, plus a canvass that’s receiving the benefits of cooler mornings . . . dark and rich, less bright white . . . and . . . yes, the southwestern light is a force to be reckoned with . . . blasting colors into a lovely subtle nuance of their hue.

Last week I featured a figurative painting from my first exhibition at the gallery in 1985. The 2011 exhibition will be the tenth show of my work at Perimeter and so this week I’ll highlight paintings from a small summer show in the late 80’s and the second solo exhibition of my work at Perimeter in 1992.

I became less interested in the figure as subject, and increasingly infatuated with the environment in which the figure functioned. These small canvasses focused on the influence one’s surroundings exert on the individual . . . an intellectual / emotional construct illustrated through the interaction between color and geometric form. ( A version of this painting is incorporated within the canvas “In A Green Room” ).   Exploring this dichotomy grew into the work that comprised the 1992 exhibition. I segmented the canvas into two portions. First, a tangled web of lines, dancing on blocks of color. The second, sharp exact geometric volumes, dark and brooding , exploding from their confinement. The spacial divisions of these paintings were derived from the earlier figurative canvasses, and the large volumes are an expansion of the forms used in the still life paintings.  This was also the time when my interest in how language influences the visual experience started to effect how I titled my paintings, combining words that captured the experience or spirit of a specific creative act rather than an explanation of what a painting might be. This is one of my favorite paintings from the 1992  Perimeter Gallery exhibition.

By the way, I’m now on Facebook.

Thanks for reading.

Charles